October 17 is National Pasta Day

According to Foodimentary, today is National Pasta Day! How many of you are willing to sacrifice the carbs to indulge in the celebration??? What is your favorite pasta? I have several, starting with a homemade fettucine and ending with the darling of pasta overload,the gnocchi. My mouth salivates as I write this introduction.

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Here are today’s five thing to know about Pasta:

  1. The average American consumes 20 lbs. of pasta annually. This makes it the 6th highest food per capita in the country.
  2. As of March 2012, the average price an American pays for pasta is $1.45 per pound! This makes it one of the most affordable meals.
  3. 24% of the global consumption of pasta is by Americans – the largest of any country in the world. Americans consume 6 billion pounds of pasta each year.
  4. The United States produces 4.4 billion pounds of pasta annually, making it the second largest pasta-producing nation.
  5. Pasta made its way to the New World through the English, who discovered it while touring Italy. Colonists brought to America the English practice of cooking noodles at least one half hour, then smothering them with cream sauce and cheese.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

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Pasta al dente (pasta cooked “to the tooth”)

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The Italian saying “al dente” in English translates to the phrase, “to the tooth”.

It is no secret that although pasta may not have originated in Italy, the Italians have perfected the art of cooking it! Growing up in a family where pasta was as common as Strohmann white bread for most Americans, I on the other hand,  knew from the time I was able to twirl spaghetti with my fork and spoon; pasta was not to be overcooked.

But if this rule of thumb still does not have you convinced, consider this: pasta al dente possesses a lower glycemic index than soft or pasta “scotto” (over-cooked) as Italians refer to it. With a slower rate of digestion than its more cooked counterpart and a slower absorption rate of carbohydrates, this tidbit of information can be a determining factor how often or how much one can indulge.

So, with this being the case, when leary about choosing a side of pasta with your main course, just remember to ask them to be sure it is prepared “al dente”

Buon appetito